Posted in Momming Hard Mondays

The Lost Art of the Roux

What do scalloped potatoes, creamy enchilada sauce, chicken pot pie, and cream of broccoli soup all have in common?  In my kitchen, a homemade roux is the foundation for all of them.

When I first learned to cook, I did so by opening cans.  My mom had given me a few of those Campbell’s soup recipe books, and I thought that was the only way to go.  I became the master of cream-soup-goop-based recipes.

And honestly, I don’t have anything against them.  I still use them from time to time.  However, I was troubled by the fact that unless I had those cans stocked up in my house, I couldn’t cook many of my favorite dishes.

How did they do it a-way-back-in-the-day…before Campbell’s soups??  (Gasp!)

I had been duped into thinking that a creamy, tasty foundation to a multitude of tasty dishes had to come from a can.

The truth is, that you can achieve the same flavour and texture quite easily by learning how to make a basic roux from scratch.

Here is the incredibly simple process:

Take equal parts butter (or margarine) and flour.  Melt the butter on the stove.  Add the flour, mix it in, and cook for a minute or two.  (It will look like a paste.)  Add liquid (broth or milk, or a combination of the two) gradually, whisking it in, until the mixture reaches your desired consistency.  Bring to a boil and simmer for a few minutes, stirring frequently.

Here are the quantities I use for 2 cups of roux (with a creamy, sauce-like consistency):

  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 cups liquid (broth or milk or a combination of the two)

Since developing this skill, I find myself in the canned soup aisle very infrequently.  I feel great about making my food ‘from scratch,’ and can adjust the taste and consistency to my liking.

For additional flavour, you may cook chopped onions or garlic in the butter before adding the flour in the process I described above.  Salt, pepper, and other seasonings can also be used to adjust the flavour of your roux.

Do you use a roux in the dishes you make?  Do you use the same process/ingredients in your roux as I do?  I would love to hear your ideas in the comments section below.

Warm wishes,

Lisa

Posted in Momming Hard Mondays

Basic, All-Purpose, Single Batch Icing

I’ve spent a good portion of my mom life confused about icing.  It seems silly, because icing is one of the simplest things to make.  However, I’ve produced several botched attempts.  I’ve made it too buttery, too wet, or too dry.  I’ve curdled cooked icings in the pot somehow.  I’ve nearly broken my arm trying to mix it with a spoon, and then found myself in an icing sugar cloud when I turned on the mixer.

There are many icing recipes out there, but I’ve found some of them to be complicated or hard to duplicate.  (At least for an amateur like myself.)

Today I will share with you the proportions and method that I have settled upon.  I like the flavour and consistency of this icing.  It’s nothing spectacular, but when you need icing in a flash for cookies (it’s great on Soft White/Grandmother’s cookies) or a cake, and have only basic ingredients and a small amount of time – this is my go-to.  As a plus, the proportions are easy to remember.

20190603_080942

Basic, All-Purpose Icing

  • 1/4 cup softened butter
  • 2 cups icing sugar
  • 1/4 cup cream or milk
  • 1-2 tsp vanilla (I just pour a splash in – yum!)
  • Food coloring (optional)

Place softened butter and icing sugar in a bowl.  Mix with hands until crumbly.  Pour in the cream or milk and vanilla.  Use an electric mixer and blend until smooth.  Add food coloring (optional) and mix in.

If you find the consistency too dry, add a few drops of milk/cream.  If too wet, add a small amount of icing sugar.

To ice a large cake (or if you like a LOT of icing), you may want to double this recipe.

 

Pretty easy, right?

I love how excited kids get about icing and sprinkles.  It’s just a sure-fire way to make the day special and put a smile on their face 🙂 .

Hope you enjoy, and if you make it, let me know in the comments how it works for you!

Warm wishes,

Lisa